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Nine in ten employees fear competitiveness of their company is threatened by technology
Workers feel firms will have to invest in new technology in order to keep up

New tech will seriously disrupt UK businesses and employment over the next five years, according to a study. 

The new Beyond Digital report, launched by digital experience consultancy Infomentum, examines how new technology trends are set to disrupt UK businesses and employment over the next five years.

Key among the report’s findings is that 91 per cent of employees do not believe their businesses will stay competitive over the next five years, with 50 per cent stating that firms will have to invest in new technology in order to keep up.

At the same time however, there is a feeling of unease that surrounds these technologies, with many firms simply 'jumping on the bandwagon' rather than strategically considering which tech will and will not work for their wider business goals.

The report also highlights the need for UK workforces to prepare for significant changes over the next five years. As new technologies come to replace a significant proportion of manual jobs, 61 per cent of employees expect their own professions to become increasingly automated by 2020.

According to Infomentum, this increased workload will most likely be driven by the mainstream use of flexible working technologies, further blurring the boundaries between work life and home.

Nearly 40 per cent of respondents would like to be able to work flexibly outside of a traditional office, while 37 per cent believe that their organisation will need to offer flexible working in order to stay competitive.

Despite this fact however, nearly two thirds of employers still will not allow their employees to work from home, while one in ten consider flexible working to be little more than a form of 'skiving'.

Men are also 12 per cent more likely to be allowed to work from home than women, as well as being 8 per cent more likely to secure flexible working hours.

Vikram Setia, chief commercial officer at Infomentum says that as technological advancements reach a pace of near constant change, businesses must be more sensitive than ever to the way new technologies are affecting reputations and ultimately bottom lines.

'As we move towards 2020, this constant change is no longer something that businesses must prepare for, but rather a reality that all organisations must embrace. Businesses, employees and even governments will all be affected.

'Attempting to fight against this torrent of change is to try and fight the future itself. Improvements in technology, automation and efficiency are coming, the only thing we as businesses can do is embrace this fact and attempt to lead the change.'

Further reading on technology

See also: How to start building a website

Related topics: Computer & IT business

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